After the time of Huineng, Chinese Chan began to branch off into numerous different schools, each with their own special emphasis, but all of which kept the same basic focus on meditational practice, personal instruction and grounded personal experience. During the late Tang and the Song periods, the tradition truly flowered, as a wide number of eminent teachers, such as Mazu 馬祖, Baijang 百丈, Yunmen 雲門 and Linji 臨濟 developed specialized teaching methods, which would become characteristic in each of the "five houses" 五家 of mature Chinese Chan. Later on, the teaching styles and words of these classical masters were recorded in such important Chan texts as the Biyan lu 碧巖録 (Blue Cliff Record) and the Wumen guan 無門關 (Gateless Barrier) which would be studied by later generations of students down to the present. Chan continued to be influential, along with Pure Land as a Buddhist religious force in China, although some energy was lost with the revival of Confucianism from the Song onward. Chan was mostly eliminated in China in the modern era with the appearance of the People's Republic, but still continues to hold a significant following in Taiwan.
Chan was gradually transmitted into Korea during the late Silla period (8th and 9th) centuries) as Korean monks of predominantly Hwaŏm 華嚴 and Consciousness-only 唯識 background began to travel to China to learn the newly developing tradition. The first transmission of Chan into Korea is attributed to a monk named Pŏmnang 法朗, but he was soon followed by a throng of Sŏn students, who later returned to Korea to establish the "nine mountain" 九山 schools, with "nine mountains" becoming a nickname for Korean Sŏn which survives down to the present. Korean Sŏn received its most significant impetus and consolidation from the Koryŏ monk Chinul 知訥, who established the Songgwangsa 松廣寺 as a new center of pure practice. It is from the time of Chinul that the predominant single meditational sect in Korea becomes the Chogye 曹溪, which survives down to the present in basically the same status. Toward the end of the Koryŏ and during the Chosŏn period the Chogye school would first be combined with the scholarly 教 schools, and then suffer from persecution at the hands of a Confucian influenced polity. Nonetheless, there would be a series of important teachers during the next several centuries, such as Hyegŭn 慧勤, T'aego 太古, Kihwa 己和 and Hyujŏng 休靜, who continued to developed the basic mold of Korean meditational Buddhism established by Chinul. Sŏn continues to be practiced in Korea today at a number of major monastic centers.
Despite the fact that Japanese Buddhists were aware of the development of the Chan school in China from a fairly early date, no formal schools were established until the 12-13th centuries, when Eisai 榮西 and Dōgen 道元 established the Rinzai 臨濟 and Sōtō 曹洞 schools, respectively. The Zen movement in Japan was fortunate to receive the patronage of the growing new force in Japanese politics, the military bakufu, and so both schools developed and throve for several centuries. But although the Shogunate of the Edo period supported Zen as an official religion, tight government control of the sect limited its creativity. Nonetheless, the Japanese schools of Zen produced a number of significant creative teachers, including such figures as Ikkyū 一休, Bankei and Hakuin 白隱. There are still a number of famous Zen monasteries preserved to the modern day in Japan, although the number of actual practicing Zen monks has declined sharply. [Dictionary References] Naka855a Iwa499 [Credit] cmuller(entry) Trang tra cứu Liên Phật Hội - Từ điển Hán Anh."> After the time of Huineng, Chinese Chan began to branch off into numerous different schools, each with their own special emphasis, but all of which kept the same basic focus on meditational practice, personal instruction and grounded personal experience. During the late Tang and the Song periods, the tradition truly flowered, as a wide number of eminent teachers, such as Mazu 馬祖, Baijang 百丈, Yunmen 雲門 and Linji 臨濟 developed specialized teaching methods, which would become characteristic in each of the "five houses" 五家 of mature Chinese Chan. Later on, the teaching styles and words of these classical masters were recorded in such important Chan texts as the Biyan lu 碧巖録 (Blue Cliff Record) and the Wumen guan 無門關 (Gateless Barrier) which would be studied by later generations of students down to the present. Chan continued to be influential, along with Pure Land as a Buddhist religious force in China, although some energy was lost with the revival of Confucianism from the Song onward. Chan was mostly eliminated in China in the modern era with the appearance of the People's Republic, but still continues to hold a significant following in Taiwan.
Chan was gradually transmitted into Korea during the late Silla period (8th and 9th) centuries) as Korean monks of predominantly Hwaŏm 華嚴 and Consciousness-only 唯識 background began to travel to China to learn the newly developing tradition. The first transmission of Chan into Korea is attributed to a monk named Pŏmnang 法朗, but he was soon followed by a throng of Sŏn students, who later returned to Korea to establish the "nine mountain" 九山 schools, with "nine mountains" becoming a nickname for Korean Sŏn which survives down to the present. Korean Sŏn received its most significant impetus and consolidation from the Koryŏ monk Chinul 知訥, who established the Songgwangsa 松廣寺 as a new center of pure practice. It is from the time of Chinul that the predominant single meditational sect in Korea becomes the Chogye 曹溪, which survives down to the present in basically the same status. Toward the end of the Koryŏ and during the Chosŏn period the Chogye school would first be combined with the scholarly 教 schools, and then suffer from persecution at the hands of a Confucian influenced polity. Nonetheless, there would be a series of important teachers during the next several centuries, such as Hyegŭn 慧勤, T'aego 太古, Kihwa 己和 and Hyujŏng 休靜, who continued to developed the basic mold of Korean meditational Buddhism established by Chinul. Sŏn continues to be practiced in Korea today at a number of major monastic centers.
Despite the fact that Japanese Buddhists were aware of the development of the Chan school in China from a fairly early date, no formal schools were established until the 12-13th centuries, when Eisai 榮西 and Dōgen 道元 established the Rinzai 臨濟 and Sōtō 曹洞 schools, respectively. The Zen movement in Japan was fortunate to receive the patronage of the growing new force in Japanese politics, the military bakufu, and so both schools developed and throve for several centuries. But although the Shogunate of the Edo period supported Zen as an official religion, tight government control of the sect limited its creativity. Nonetheless, the Japanese schools of Zen produced a number of significant creative teachers, including such figures as Ikkyū 一休, Bankei and Hakuin 白隱. There are still a number of famous Zen monasteries preserved to the modern day in Japan, although the number of actual practicing Zen monks has declined sharply. [Dictionary References] Naka855a Iwa499 [Credit] cmuller(entry) Trang tra cứu Liên Phật Hội - Từ điển Hán Anh." /> After the time of Huineng, Chinese Chan began to branch off into numerous different schools, each with their own special emphasis, but all of which kept the same basic focus on meditational practice, personal instruction and grounded personal experience. During the late Tang and the Song periods, the tradition truly flowered, as a wide number of eminent teachers, such as Mazu 馬祖, Baijang 百丈, Yunmen 雲門 and Linji 臨濟 developed specialized teaching methods, which would become characteristic in each of the "five houses" 五家 of mature Chinese Chan. Later on, the teaching styles and words of these classical masters were recorded in such important Chan texts as the Biyan lu 碧巖録 (Blue Cliff Record) and the Wumen guan 無門關 (Gateless Barrier) which would be studied by later generations of students down to the present. Chan continued to be influential, along with Pure Land as a Buddhist religious force in China, although some energy was lost with the revival of Confucianism from the Song onward. Chan was mostly eliminated in China in the modern era with the appearance of the People's Republic, but still continues to hold a significant following in Taiwan.
Chan was gradually transmitted into Korea during the late Silla period (8th and 9th) centuries) as Korean monks of predominantly Hwaŏm 華嚴 and Consciousness-only 唯識 background began to travel to China to learn the newly developing tradition. The first transmission of Chan into Korea is attributed to a monk named Pŏmnang 法朗, but he was soon followed by a throng of Sŏn students, who later returned to Korea to establish the "nine mountain" 九山 schools, with "nine mountains" becoming a nickname for Korean Sŏn which survives down to the present. Korean Sŏn received its most significant impetus and consolidation from the Koryŏ monk Chinul 知訥, who established the Songgwangsa 松廣寺 as a new center of pure practice. It is from the time of Chinul that the predominant single meditational sect in Korea becomes the Chogye 曹溪, which survives down to the present in basically the same status. Toward the end of the Koryŏ and during the Chosŏn period the Chogye school would first be combined with the scholarly 教 schools, and then suffer from persecution at the hands of a Confucian influenced polity. Nonetheless, there would be a series of important teachers during the next several centuries, such as Hyegŭn 慧勤, T'aego 太古, Kihwa 己和 and Hyujŏng 休靜, who continued to developed the basic mold of Korean meditational Buddhism established by Chinul. Sŏn continues to be practiced in Korea today at a number of major monastic centers.
Despite the fact that Japanese Buddhists were aware of the development of the Chan school in China from a fairly early date, no formal schools were established until the 12-13th centuries, when Eisai 榮西 and Dōgen 道元 established the Rinzai 臨濟 and Sōtō 曹洞 schools, respectively. The Zen movement in Japan was fortunate to receive the patronage of the growing new force in Japanese politics, the military bakufu, and so both schools developed and throve for several centuries. But although the Shogunate of the Edo period supported Zen as an official religion, tight government control of the sect limited its creativity. Nonetheless, the Japanese schools of Zen produced a number of significant creative teachers, including such figures as Ikkyū 一休, Bankei and Hakuin 白隱. There are still a number of famous Zen monasteries preserved to the modern day in Japan, although the number of actual practicing Zen monks has declined sharply. [Dictionary References] Naka855a Iwa499 [Credit] cmuller(entry) Trang tra cứu Liên Phật Hội - Từ điển Hán Anh."/>

Mỗi cơn giận luôn có một nguyên nhân, nhưng rất hiếm khi đó là nguyên nhân chính đáng. (Anger is never without a reason, but seldom with a good one.)Benjamin Franklin
Tôn giáo của tôi rất đơn giản, đó chính là lòng tốt.Đức Đạt-lai Lạt-ma XIV
Không thể lấy hận thù để diệt trừ thù hận. Kinh Pháp cú
Ta sẽ có được sức mạnh của sự cám dỗ mà ta cưỡng lại được. (We gain the strength of the temptation we resist.)Ralph Waldo Emerson
Người ta thuận theo sự mong ước tầm thường, cầu lấy danh tiếng. Khi được danh tiếng thì thân không còn nữa.Kinh Bốn mươi hai chương
Để có đôi mắt đẹp, hãy chọn nhìn những điều tốt đẹp ở người khác; để có đôi môi đẹp, hãy nói ra toàn những lời tử tế, và để vững vàng trong cuộc sống, hãy bước đi với ý thức rằng bạn không bao giờ cô độc. (For beautiful eyes, look for the good in others; for beautiful lips, speak only words of kindness; and for poise, walk with the knowledge that you are never alone.)Audrey Hepburn
Với kẻ kiên trì thì không có gì là khó, như dòng nước chảy mãi cũng làm mòn tảng đá.Kinh Lời dạy cuối cùng
Hãy nhớ rằng, có đôi khi im lặng là câu trả lời tốt nhất.Đức Đạt-lai Lạt-ma XIV
Nụ cười biểu lộ niềm vui, và niềm vui là dấu hiệu tồn tại tích cực của cuộc sống.Tủ sách Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn
Nhiệm vụ của con người chúng ta là phải tự giải thoát chính mình bằng cách mở rộng tình thương đến với muôn loài cũng như toàn bộ thiên nhiên tươi đẹp. (Our task must be to free ourselves by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and its beauty.)Albert Einstein

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