Kẻ yếu ớt không bao giờ có thể tha thứ. Tha thứ là phẩm chất của người mạnh mẽ. (The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.)Mahatma Gandhi
Người duy nhất mà bạn nên cố gắng vượt qua chính là bản thân bạn của ngày hôm qua. (The only person you should try to be better than is the person you were yesterday.)Khuyết danh
Người ta thuận theo sự mong ước tầm thường, cầu lấy danh tiếng. Khi được danh tiếng thì thân không còn nữa.Kinh Bốn mươi hai chương
Chúng ta không thể giải quyết các vấn đề bất ổn của mình với cùng những suy nghĩ giống như khi ta đã tạo ra chúng. (We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.)Albert Einstein
Hạnh phúc đích thực không quá đắt, nhưng chúng ta phải trả giá quá nhiều cho những thứ ta lầm tưởng là hạnh phúc. (Real happiness is cheap enough, yet how dearly we pay for its counterfeit.)Hosea Ballou
Hạnh phúc và sự thỏa mãn của con người cần phải phát xuất từ chính mình. Sẽ là một sai lầm nếu ta mong mỏi sự thỏa mãn cuối cùng đến từ tiền bạc hoặc máy điện toán.Đức Đạt-lai Lạt-ma XIV
Chúng ta nên hối tiếc về những sai lầm và học hỏi từ đó, nhưng đừng bao giờ mang theo chúng vào tương lai. (We should regret our mistakes and learn from them, but never carry them forward into the future with us. )Lucy Maud Montgomery
Hạnh phúc giống như một nụ hôn. Bạn phải chia sẻ với một ai đó mới có thể tận hưởng được nó. (Happiness is like a kiss. You must share it to enjoy it.)Bernard Meltzer
Khi ý thức được rằng giá trị của cuộc sống nằm ở chỗ là chúng ta đang sống, ta sẽ thấy tất cả những điều khác đều trở nên nhỏ nhặt, vụn vặt không đáng kể.Tủ sách Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn
Đừng cố trở nên một người thành đạt, tốt hơn nên cố gắng trở thành một người có phẩm giá. (Try not to become a man of success, but rather try to become a man of value.)Albert Einstein

Trang chủ »» Danh mục »» THUYẾT GIẢNG GIÁO PHÁP »» Mindfulness In Plain English »» Chapter 6: What To Do With Your Body »»

Mindfulness In Plain English
»» Chapter 6: What To Do With Your Body

(Lượt xem: 13.570)
Xem trong Thư phòng    Xem định dạng khác    Xem Mục lục  Vietnamese || Đối chiếu song ngữ


       

Chánh niệm - Thực tập thiền quán - Chương Sáu: Phương cách điều thân

Font chữ:

The practice of meditation has been going on for several thousand years. That is quite a bit of time for experimentation, and the procedure has been very, very thoroughly refined. Buddhist practice has always recognized that the mind and body are tightly linked and that each influences the other. Thus there are certain recommended physical practices which will greatly assist you to master your skill. And these practices should be followed. Keep in mind, however, that these postures are practice aids. Don't confuse the two. Meditation does not mean sitting in the lotus position. It is a mental skill. It can be practiced anywhere you wish. But these postures will help you learn this skill and they speed your progress and development. So use them.

General Rules

The purpose of the various postures is threefold. First, they provide a stable feeling in the body. This allows you to remove your attention from such issues as balance and muscular fatigue, so that you can then center your concentration upon the formal object of meditation. Second, they promote physical immobility which is then reflected by an immobility of mind. This creates a deeply settled and tranquil concentration. Third, they give you the ability to sit for a long period of time without yielding to the meditator's three main enemies--pain, muscular tension and falling asleep.

The most essential thing is to sit with your back straight. The spine should be erect with the spinal vertebrae held like a stack of coins, one on top of the other. Your head should be held in line with the rest of the spine. All of this is done in a relaxed manner. No Stiffness. You are not a wooden soldier, and there is no drill sergeant. There should be no muscular tension involved in keeping the back straight. Sit light and easy. The spine should be like a firm young tree growing out of soft ground. The rest of the body just hangs from it in a loose, relaxed manner. This is going to require a bit of experimentation on your part. We generally sit in tight, guarded postures when we are walking or talking and in sprawling postures when we are relaxing. Neither of those will do. But they are cultural habits and they can be re-learned.

Your objective is to achieve a posture in which you can sit for the entire session without moving at all. In the beginning, you will probably feel a bit odd to sit with the straight back. But you will get used to it. It takes practice, and an erect posture is very important. This is what is known in physiology as a position of arousal, and with it goes mental alertness. If you slouch, you are inviting drowsiness. What you sit on is equally important. You are going to need a chair or a cushion, depending on the posture you choose, and the firmness of the seat must be chosen with some care. Too soft a seat can put you right to sleep. Too hard can promote pain.

Clothing

The clothes you wear for meditation should be loose and soft. If they restrict blood flow or put pressure on nerves, the result will be pain and/or that tingling numbness which we normally refer to as our 'legs going to sleep'. If you are wearing a belt, loosen it. Don't wear tight pants or pants made of thick material. Long skirts are a good choice for women. Loose pants made of thin or elastic material are fine for anybody. Soft, flowing robes are the traditional garb in Asia and they come in an enormous variety of styles such as sarongs and kimonos. Take your shoes off and if your stockings are thick and binding, take them off, too.

Traditional Postures

When you are sitting on the floor in the traditional Asian manner, you need a cushion to elevate your spine. Choose one that is relatively firm and at least three inches thick when compressed. Sit close to the front edge of the cushion and let your crossed legs rest on the floor in front of you. If the floor is carpeted, that may be enough to protect your shins and ankles from pressure. If it is not, you will probably need some sort of padding for your legs. A folded blanket will do nicely. Don't sit all the way back on the cushion. This position causes its front edge to press into the underside of your thigh, causing nerves to pinch. The result will be leg pain.

There are a number of ways you can fold your legs. We will list four in ascending order of preference.

1. American indian style. Your right foot is tucked under the left knee and left foot is tucked under your right knee.

2. Burmese style. Both of your legs lie flat on the floor from knee to foot. They are parallel with each other and one in front of the other.

3. Half lotus. Both knees touch the floor. One leg and foot lie flat along the calf of the other leg.

4. Full lotus. Both knees touch the floor, and your legs are crossed at the calf. Your left foot rests on the right thigh, and your right foot rests on the left thigh. Both soles turn upward.

In these postures, your hands are cupped one on the other, and they rest on your lap with the palms turned upward. The hands lie just below the navel with the bend of each wrist pressed against the thigh. This arm position provides firm bracing for the upper body. Don't tighten your neck muscles. Relax your arms. Your diaphragm is held relaxed, expanded to maximum fullness. Don't let tension build up in the stomach area. Your chin is up. Your eyes can be open or closed. If you keep them open, fix them on the tip of your nose or in the middle distance straight in front. You are not looking at anything. You are just putting your eyes in some arbitrary direction where there is nothing in particular to see, so that you can forget about vision. Don't strain. Don't stiffen and don't be rigid. Relax; let the body be natural and supple. Let it hang from the erect spine like a rag doll.

Half and full lotus positions are the traditional meditation postures in asia. And the full lotus is considered the best. It is the most solid by far. Once you are locked into this position, you can be completely immovable for a very long period. Since it requires a considerable flexibility in the legs, not everybody can do it. Besides, the main criterion by which you choose a posture for yourself is not what others say about it. It is your own comfort. Choose a position which allows you to sit the longest without pain, without moving. Experiment with different postures. The tendons will loosen with practice. And then you can work gradually towards the full lotus.

Using A Chair

Sitting on the floor may not be feasible for you because of pain or some other reason. No problem. You can always use a chair instead. Pick one that has a level seat, a straight back and no arms. It is best to sit in such a way that your back does not lean against the back of the chair. The front of the seat should not dig into the underside of your thighs. Place your legs side by side,feet flat on the floor. As with the traditional postures, place both hands on your lap, cupped one upon the other. Don't tighten your neck or shoulder muscles, and relax your arms. Your eyes can be open or closed.

In all the above postures, remember your objectives. You want to achieve a state of complete physical stillness, yet you don't want to fall asleep. Recall the analogy of the muddy water. You want to promote a totally settled state of the body which will engender a corresponding mental settling. There must also be a state of physical alertness which can induce the kind of mental clarity you seek. So experiment. Your body is a tool for creating desired mental states. Use it judiciously.

    « Xem chương trước «      « Sách này có 18 chương »       » Xem chương tiếp theo »
» Tải file Word về máy » - In chương sách này

_______________

MUA THỈNH KINH SÁCH PHẬT HỌC

DO NXB LIÊN PHẬT HỘI PHÁT HÀNH




Những tâm tình cô đơn


Sống và chết theo quan niệm Phật giáo


Kinh Phổ Môn


Phù trợ người lâm chung

Mua sách qua Amazon sẽ được gửi đến tận nhà - trên toàn nước Mỹ, Canada, Âu châu và Úc châu.

XEM TRANG GIỚI THIỆU.






DONATION

Quý vị đang truy cập từ IP 3.236.70.233 và chưa ghi danh hoặc đăng nhập trên máy tính này. Nếu là thành viên, quý vị chỉ cần đăng nhập một lần duy nhất trên thiết bị truy cập, bằng email và mật khẩu đã chọn.
Chúng tôi khuyến khích việc ghi danh thành viên ,để thuận tiện trong việc chia sẻ thông tin, chia sẻ kinh nghiệm sống giữa các thành viên, đồng thời quý vị cũng sẽ nhận được sự hỗ trợ kỹ thuật từ Ban Quản Trị trong quá trình sử dụng website này.
Việc ghi danh là hoàn toàn miễn phí và tự nguyện.

Ghi danh hoặc đăng nhập

Thành viên đang online:
Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Trần Thị Huyền Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn thái quân Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Tịch Nguyệt Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Chúc Huy Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Tam Thanh01 Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn NGUYỄN TRỌNG TÀI Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn đức Lâm Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Thu Loan Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Davidlam Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Hoat Khong Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Trương Quang Quý Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Leanbinh Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Pascal Bui Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Tâm Lương Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Ngọc Châu Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Phan Huy Triều Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn 釋祥厳 Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Tăng Văn Y Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn ĐẶNG THỊ THU AN Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Văn Dũng Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Chanhniem Forever Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Lâm Thành Được Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Quảng Thúy Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn phuctan Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Thích Thện Tâm Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Thiện Diệu Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Trương Ngọc Trân Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Viễn Tương Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Sống chậm Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Nhị Kim Uyên Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn nguyen ba tho Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Vô Trí Sĩ Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Tâm Tịnh Đức Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn vokhulai Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn ntha102 Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Vạn Phúc Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Nguyễn Sĩ Long Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn nmtst94 Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Minh Hữu Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn Mai Phượng ... ...

Hoa Kỳ (1.168 lượt xem) - Việt Nam (149 lượt xem) - Senegal (90 lượt xem) - Central African Republic (46 lượt xem) - Anh quốc (1 lượt xem) - ... ...