Dễ thay thấy lỗi người, lỗi mình thấy mới khó.Kinh Pháp cú (Kệ số 252)
Kẻ hung dữ hại người cũng như ngửa mặt lên trời mà phun nước bọt. Nước bọt ấy chẳng lên đến trời, lại rơi xuống chính mình.Kinh Bốn mươi hai chương
Không nên nhìn lỗi người, người làm hay không làm.Nên nhìn tự chính mình, có làm hay không làm.Kinh Pháp cú (Kệ số 50)
Cái hại của sự nóng giận là phá hoại các pháp lành, làm mất danh tiếng tốt, khiến cho đời này và đời sau chẳng ai muốn gặp gỡ mình.Kinh Lời dạy cuối cùng
Như ngôi nhà khéo lợp, mưa không xâm nhập vào. Cũng vậy tâm khéo tu, tham dục không xâm nhập.Kinh Pháp cú (Kệ số 14)
Giặc phiền não thường luôn rình rập giết hại người, độc hại hơn kẻ oán thù. Sao còn ham ngủ mà chẳng chịu tỉnh thức?Kinh Lời dạy cuối cùng
Ai sống quán bất tịnh, khéo hộ trì các căn, ăn uống có tiết độ, có lòng tin, tinh cần, ma không uy hiếp được, như núi đá, trước gió.Kinh Pháp cú (Kệ số 8)
Dầu nói ra ngàn câu nhưng không lợi ích gì, tốt hơn nói một câu có nghĩa, nghe xong tâm ý được an tịnh vui thích.Kinh Pháp cú (Kệ số 101)
Nay vui, đời sau vui, làm phước, hai đời vui.Kinh Pháp Cú (Kệ số 16)
Vui thay, chúng ta sống, Không hận, giữa hận thù! Giữa những người thù hận, Ta sống, không hận thù!Kinh Pháp Cú (Kệ số 197)

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Sutta Nipata

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I. Pabbaja Sutta: The Going Forth
I will describe the Going Forth,
how he, the One-with-Vision, went forth,
how he reasoned and chose the Going Forth.
"Household life is crowded,
a realm of dust,
while going forth
is the open air."
Seeing this, he went forth.
On going forth,
he avoided evil deeds in body.
Abandoning verbal misconduct,
he purified his livelihood.
Then he, the Buddha, went to Rajagaha,
the mountain fortress of the Magadhans,
and wandered for alms,
endowed with all the foremost marks.
King Bimbisara, standing in his palace, saw him,
and on seeing him, consummate in marks,
said: "Look at this one, sirs.
How handsome, stately, pure!
How consummate his demeanor!
Mindful, his eyes downcast,
looking only a plow-length before him,
as one who's not from a lowly lineage:
Send the royal messengers at once
to see where this monk will go."
They — the messengers dispatched —
followed behind him.
"Where will this monk go?
Where will his dwelling place be?"
As he went from house to house —
well-restrained, his sense-doors guarded,
mindful, alert —
his bowl filled quickly.
Then he, the sage, completing his alms round,
left the city, headed for Mount Pandava.
"That's where his dwelling will be."
Seeing him go to his dwelling place,
three messengers sat down,
while one returned to tell the king.
"That monk, your majesty,
on the flank of Pandava,
sits like a tiger, a bull,
a lion in a mountain cleft."
Hearing the messenger's words,
the noble warrior king
straight away went by royal coach,
out to Mount Pandava.
Going as far as the coach would go,
he got down, went up on foot,
and on arrival sat down.
Sitting there,
he exchanged courteous greetings,
then said:
"You are young, youthful,
in the first stage of youth,
endowed with the stature & coloring
of a noble-warrior.
You would look glorious
in the vanguard of an army,
arrayed with an elephant squadron.
I offer you wealth : enjoy it.
I ask your birth : inform me."
"Straight ahead, your majesty,
by the foothills of the Himalayas,
is a country consummate
in energy & wealth,
inhabited by Kosalans:
Solar by clan,
Sakyans by birth.
From that lineage I have gone forth,
but not in search of sensual pleasures.
Seeing the danger in sensual pleasures
— and renunciation as rest —
I go to strive.
That's where my heart delights."
II. Padhana Sutta: Exertion
To me —
resolute in exertion
near the river Nerañjara,
making a great effort,
doing jhana
to attain rest from the yoke —
Namuci[1] came,
speaking words of compassion:
"You are ashen, thin.
Death is in
your presence.
Death
has 1,000 parts of you.
Only one part
is your life.
Live, good sir!
Life is better.
Alive,
you can do
acts of merit.
Your living the holy life,
performing the fire sacrifice,
will heap up much merit.
What use is exertion to you?
Hard to follow
— the path of exertion —
hard to do, hard
to sustain."
Saying these verses,
Mara stood in the Awakened One's presence.
And to that Mara, speaking thus,
the Blessed One said this:
"Kinsman of the heedless,
Evil One,
come here for whatever purpose:
I haven't, for merit,
even the least bit of need.
Those who have need of merit:
those are the ones
Mara's fit to address.
In me are conviction,
austerity,
persistence,
discernment.
Why, when I'm so resolute
do you petition me
to live?
This wind could burn up
even river currents.
Why, when I'm resolute
shouldn't my blood dry away?
As my blood dries up
gall & phlegm dry up.
As muscles waste away,
the mind grows clearer;
mindfulness, discernment,
concentration stand
more firm.
Staying in this way,
attaining the ultimate feeling,[2]
the mind has no interest
in sensual passions.
See:
a being's
purity!
Sensual passions are your first army.
Your second is called Discontent.
Your third is Hunger & Thirst.
Your fourth is called Craving.
Fifth is Sloth & Drowsiness.
Sixth is called Terror.
Your seventh is Uncertainty.
Hypocrisy & Stubbornness, your eighth.
Gains, Offerings, Fame, & Status
wrongly gained,
and whoever would praise self
& disparage others.
That, Namuci, is your army,
the Dark One's commando force.
A coward can't defeat it,
but one having defeated it
gains bliss.
Do I carry muñja grass?[3]
I spit on my life.
Death in battle woud be better for me
than that I, defeated,
survive.
Sinking here, they don't appear,
some brahmans & contemplatives.
They don't know the path
by which those with good practices
go.
Seeing the bannered force
on all sides —
the troops, Mara
along with his mount —
I go into battle.
May they not budge me
from
my spot.
That army of yours,
that the world with its devas
can't overcome,
I will smash with discernment —
as an unfired pot with a stone.
Making my resolve mastered,
mindfulness well-established,
I will go about, from kingdom to kingdom,
training many disciples.
They — heedful, resolute
doing my bidding —
despite your wishes, will go
where, having gone,
there's no grief."
Mara:
"For seven years, I've dogged
the Blessed One's steps,
but haven't gained an opening
in the One Self-awakened
& glorious.
A crow circled a stone
the color of fat
— 'Maybe I've found
something tender here.
Maybe there's something delicious' —
but not getting anything delicious there,
the crow went away.
Like the crow attacking the rock,
I weary myself with Gotama."
As he was overcome with sorrow,
his lute fell from under his arm.
Then he, the despondent spirit,
right there
disappeared.
Notes
1.
Mara.
2.
The highest equanimity that can be attained through jhana.
3.
Muñja grass was the ancient Indian equivalent of a white flag. A warrior expecting that he might have to surrender would take muñja grass into battle with him. If he did surrender, he would lie down with the muñja grass in his mouth. The Buddha, in asking this rhetorical question, is indicating that he is not the type of warrior who would carry muñja grass. If defeated, he would rather die than surrender.
III. Subhasita Sutta: Well-Spoken
I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying in Savatthi at Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery. There he addressed the monks, "Monks!"
"Yes, lord," the monks replied.
The Blessed One said: "Monks, speech endowed with four characteristics is well-spoken, not poorly spoken — faultless & not to be faulted by the wise. Which four? There is the case where a monk says only what it well-spoken, not what is poorly spoken; only what is just, not what is unjust; only what is endearing, not what is unendearing; only what is true, not what is false. Speech endowed with these four characteristics is well-spoken, not poorly spoken — faultless & not to be faulted by the wise."
That is what the Blessed One said. Having said this, the One Well-Gone, the Teacher, said further:
The calm say that what is well-spoken is best;
second, that one should say
what is just, not unjust;
third, what's endearing, not unendearing;
fourth, what is true, not false.
Then Ven. Vangisa, rising from his seat, arranging his robe over one shoulder, faced the Blessed One with his hands palm-to-palm in front of his heart and said, "An inspiration has come to me, Blessed One! An inspiration has come to me, One Well-Gone!"
"Let the inspiration come to you, Vangisa," the Blessed One said.
Then Ven. Vangisa praised the Blessed One to his face with these attractive verses:
Speak only the speech
that neither torments self
nor does harm to others.
That speech is truly well spoken.
Speak only endearing speech,
speech that is welcomed.
Speech when it brings no evil
to others
is pleasant.
Truth, indeed, is deathless speech:
This is an ancient principle.
The goal and the Dhamma
— so say the calm —
are firmly established on truth.
The speech the Awakened One speaks,
for attaining Unbinding,
rest,
for making an end
to the mass of stress:
That is the speech unexcelled.
VIII. Salla Sutta: The Arrow
Without sign,
unknown
— the life here of mortals —
difficult,
short,
tied up with pain.
For there's no way
by which those who are born
will not die.
Beings are subject
to death
even when they attain
old age.
Like ripe fruits
whose downfall, whose danger
is falling,
so for mortals, once born,
the constant danger
is death.
As a potter's clay vessels
large & small
fired & unfired
all end up broken,
so too life
heads to death.
Young & old
wise & foolish
rich & poor:
all
come under the sway of death,
all
have death as their end.
For those overcome by death,
gone to the other world,
father cannot shelter son,
nor relatives a relative.
See: even while relatives are looking on,
wailing heavily,
mortals are
one
by
one
led away
like cows to the slaughter.
In this way is the world afflicted
with aging & death,
and so the enlightened don't grieve,
knowing the way of the world.
"You don't know the path
of his coming or going:
seeing neither end,
you lament in vain."
If, by lamenting,
— confused,
harming yourself —
any use could be gained
the prudent would do it as well.
But not by weeping & grief
do you gain peace of awareness.
Pain
arises all the more. Your body
is harmed.
You grow thin,
pale,
harming yourself
by yourself.
Not in that way
are the dead protected.
Lamentation's in vain.
Not abandoning grief, a person
suffers all the more pain.
Bewailing one whose time is done,
you fall under the sway of grief.
Look at others
going along,
people arriving
in line with their actions:
falling under the sway of death,
beings simply
shivering here.
For however they imagine it,
it always turns out
other than that.
That's the type of (their) separation.
See the way of the world.
Even if a person lives a century
— or more —
he's parted
from his community of relatives,
he abandons his life
right here.
So, having heard the arahant,
subduing lamentation,
seeing the dead one whose time is done,
[think,] "I can't fetch him back." [1]
Just as one would put out
a burning refuge
with water,
so does the enlightened one —
discerning,
skillful,
& wise —
blow away any arisen grief,
like the wind, a bit of cotton fluff.
Seeking your own happiness,
you should pull out your own arrow:
your own lamentation,
longing,
& sorrow. [2]
With arrow pulled out,
independent,
attaining peace of awareness,
all grief transcended,
griefless you are
unbound.
Notes
1.
These lines can also be translated as follows:
So, having heard the arahant,
subdue lamentation,
seeing the dead one whose time is done,
[and thinking,] "I can't fetch him back."
2.
These lines can also be translated as follows:
Just as one would put out
a burning refuge
with water,
so does the enlightened one —
discerning,
skillful,
& wise —
blow away any arisen grief,
his own lamentation, longing, & sorrow,
like the wind, a bit of cotton fluff.
Seeking your own happiness,
you should pull out your own arrow.
XI. Nalaka Sutta: To Nalaka
Asita the seer, in his mid-day meditation,
saw the devas of the Group of Thirty
— exultant, ecstatic —
dressed in pure white, honoring Indra,
holding up banners, cheering wildly,
& on seeing the devas so joyful & happy,
having paid his respects, he said:
"Why is the deva community
so wildly elated?
Why are they holding up banners
& waving them around?
Even after the war with the Asuras
— when victory was the devas'.
the Asuras defeated —
even then there was no excitement like this.
Seeing what marvel
are the devas so joyful?
They shout,
they sing,
play music,
clap their hands,
dance.
So I ask you, who live on Mount Meru's summit.
Please dispel my doubt quickly, dear sirs."
"The Bodhisatta, the foremost jewel,
unequaled,
has been born for welfare & ease
in the human world,
in a town in the Sakyan countryside,
Lumbini.
That's why we're all so wildly elated.
He, the highest of all beings,
the ultimate person,
a bull among men, foremost of all people,
will set turning the Wheel [of Dhamma]
in the grove named after the seers,
like a strong, roaring lion,
the conqueror of beasts."
Hearing these words,
Asita quickly descended [from heaven]
and went to Suddhodana's dwelling.
There, taking a seat, he said to the Sakyans:
"Where is the prince?
I, too, want to see him."
The Sakyans then showed
to the seer named Asita
their son, the prince,
like gold aglow,
burnished by a most skillful smith
in the mouth of the furnace,
blazing with glory, flawless in color.
On seeing the prince blazing like flame,
pure like the bull of the stars
going across the sky
— the burning sun,
released from the clouds of autumn —
he was exultant, filled with abundant rapture.
The devas held in the sky
a many-spoked sunshade
of a thousand circles.
Gold-handled whisks
waved up & down,
but those holding the whisks & the sunshade
couldn't be seen.
The matted-haired seer
named Dark Splendor,
seeing the boy, like an ornament of gold
on the red woolen blanket,
a white sunshade held over his head,
received him, happy & pleased.
And on receiving the bull of the Sakyans,
longingly, the master of mantras & signs
exclaimed with a confident mind:
"This one is unsurpassed,
the highest of the biped race."
Then, foreseeing his own imminent departure,
he, dejected, shed tears.
On seeing him weeping,
the Sakyans asked:
"But surely there will be
no danger for the prince?"
On seeing the Sakyans' concern
he replied, "I foresee for the prince
no harm.
Nor will there be any danger for him.
This one isn't lowly: be assured.
This prince will touch
the ultimate self-awakening.
He, seeing the utmost purity,
will set rolling the Wheel of Dhamma
through sympathy for the welfare of many.
His holy life will spread far & wide.
But as for me,
my life here has no long remainder;
my death will take place before then.
I won't get to hear
the Dhamma of this one with the peerless role.
That's why I'm stricken,
afflicted, & pained."
He, having brought the Sakyans
abundant rapture,
the follower of the holy life
left the inner chamber and,
out of sympathy for his nephew,
urged him on toward the Dhamma
of the one with the peerless role:
"When you hear from another the word,
"Awakened One,"
or "Attaining self-awakening,
he lays open the path of the Dhamma,"
go there & ask him yourself.
Follow the holy life
under that Blessed One."
Instructed by the one
whose mind was set on his benefit,
Such,
seeing in the future the utmost purity,
Nalaka, who had laid up a store of merit,
awaited the Victor expectantly,
guarding his senses.
On hearing word of the Victor's
turning of the foremost wheel,
he went, he saw
the bull among seers. Confident,
he asked the foremost sage
about the highest sagacity,
now that Asita's forecast
had come to pass.
[Nalaka:]
Now that I know
Asita's words to be true,
I ask you, Gotama,
you who have gone
to the beyond of all things.
I'm intent on the homeless life;
I long for the almsround.
Tell me sage, when I ask you,
the utmost state of sagacity.
[The Buddha:]
I'll explain to you
a sagacity hard to do,
hard to endure.
Come now, I'll tell you.
Be steadfast. Be firm.
Practice even-mindedness,
for in a village
there's praise & abuse.
Ward off any flaw in the heart.
Go about calmed & not haughty.
High & low things will come up
like fire-flames in a forest.
Women seduce a sage.
May they not seduce you.[1]
Abstaining from sexual intercourse,
abandoning various sensual pleasures,
be unopposed, unattached,
to beings moving & still.
'As I am, so are these.
As are these, so am I.'
Drawing the parallel to
yourself,
neither kill nor get others to kill.
Abandoning the wants & greed
where people run-of-the-mill are stuck,
practice with vision,
cross over this hell.
Stomach not full,
moderate in food,
having few wants,
not being greedy,
always not hankering after desire:
one without hankering,
is one who's unbound.
Having gone on his almsround, the sage
should then go to the forest,
standing or taking a seat
at the foot of a tree.
The enlightened one, intent on jhana,
should find delight in the forest,
should practice jhana at the foot of a tree,
attaining his own satisfaction.
Then, at the end of the night,
he should go to the village,
not delighting in an invitation
or gift from the village.
Having gone to the village,
the sage should not carelessly
go among families.
Cutting off chatter,
he shouldn't utter a scheming word.
'I got something,
that's fine.
I got nothing,
that's good.'
Being such with regard to both,
he returns to the very same tree.
Wandering with his bowl in hand
— not dumb,
but seemingly dumb —
he shouldn't despise a piddling gift
nor disparage the giver.
High & low are the practices
proclaimed by the contemplative.
They don't go twice to the further shore.
This [Unbinding] isn't sensed only once.[2]
In one who has no attachment —
the monk who has cut the stream,
abandoning what is
& isn't a duty —
no fever is found.
I'll explain to you
sagacity: be like a razor's edge.
Pressing tongue against palate,
restrain your stomach.
Neither be lazy in mind,
nor have many thoughts.
Be committed to taintlessness,
independent,
having the holy life as your aim.
Train in solitude
& the contemplative's task,
Solitude
is called
sagacity.
Alone, you truly delight
& shine in the ten directions.
On hearing the fame of the enlightened
— those who practice jhana,
relinquishing sensual pleasures —
my disciple should foster
all the more
conviction & conscience.
Know from the rivers
in clefts & in crevices:
those in small channels flow
noisily,
the great
flow silent.
Whatever's not full
makes noise.
Whatever is full
is quiet.
The fool is like a half-empty pot;
one who is wise, a full lake.
A contemplative who speaks a great deal
endowed with meaning:
knowing, he teaches the Dhamma,
knowing, he speaks a great deal.
But he who,
knowing, is restrained,
knowing, doesn't speak a great deal:
he is a sage
worthy of sagehood;
he is a sage,
his sagehood attained.
Notes
1.
For an instance of a man who tried to seduce a nun, see Therigatha XIV.
2.
According to the Commentary, the high and low practices taught by the Buddha are, respectively, the practice-mode of pleasant practice and quick intuition, and the practice-mode of painful practice and slow intuition (see AN 4.162; The Wings to Awakening, passage 84). These modes of practice don't go twice to the further shore in the sense that each of the four paths — to stream-entry, once-returning, non-returning, and arahantship — abandons whatever defilements it is capable of abandoning once and for all. There is no need to repeat the path. Unbinding is not attained only once in the sense that it is touched as the result of each of the four paths.
XII. Dvayatanupassana Sutta: The Contemplation of Dualities
I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi in the Eastern Monastery, the palace of Migara's mother. Now on that occasion — the Uposatha day of the fifteenth, the full-moon night — the Blessed One was sitting in the open air surrounded by the community of monks. Surveying the silent community of monks, he addressed them: "Monks, if there are any who ask, 'Your listening to teachings that are skillful, noble, leading onward, going to self-awakening is a prerequisite for what?' they should be told, 'For the sake of knowing qualities of dualities as they actually are.' 'What duality are you speaking about?' 'This is stress. This is the origination of stress': this is one contemplation. 'This is the cessation of stress. This is the path of practice leading to the cessation of stress': this is a second contemplation. For a monk rightly contemplating this duality in this way — heedful, ardent, & resolute — one of two fruits can be expected: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return."
That is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One Well-gone, the Teacher, said further:
Those who don't discern stress,
what brings stress into play,
& where it totally stops,
without trace;
who don't know the path,
the way to the stilling of stress:
lowly
in their awareness-release
& discernment-release,
incapable
of making an end,
they're headed
to birth & aging.
But those who discern stress,
what brings stress into play,
& where it totally stops,
without trace;
who discern the path,
the way to the stilling of stress:
consummate
in their awareness-release
& discernment-release,
capable
of making an end,
they aren't headed
to birth & aging.
"Now, if there are any who ask, 'Would there be the right contemplation of dualities in yet another way?' they should be told, 'There would.' 'How would that be?' 'Whatever stress comes into play is all from acquisition as a requisite condition': this is one contemplation. 'From the remainderless fading & cessation of that very acquisition, there is no coming into play of stress': this is a second contemplation. For a monk rightly contemplating this duality in this way — heedful, ardent, & resolute — one of two fruits can be expected: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return."
That is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One Well-gone, the Teacher, said further:
The manifold stresses
that come into play in the world,
come from acquisition as their cause.
Anyone not knowing [this]
creates acquisition.
The fool, he comes to stress
again & again.
Therefore, discerning [this],
you shouldn't create acquisition
as you contemplate birth
as what brings stress
into play.
"Now, if there are any who ask, 'Would there be the right contemplation of dualities in yet another way?' they should be told, 'There would.' 'How would that be?' 'Whatever stress comes into play is all from ignorance as a requisite condition': this is one contemplation. 'From the remainderless fading & cessation of that very ignorance, there is no coming into play of stress': this is a second contemplation. For a monk rightly contemplating this duality in this way — heedful, ardent, & resolute — one of two fruits can be expected: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return."
That is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One Well-gone, the Teacher, said further:
Those who journey the wandering-on
through birth & death, again & again,
in this state here
or anywhere else,
that destination is simply through ignorance.
This ignorance is a great delusion
whereby they have wandered-on
a long, long time.
While beings immersed in clear knowing
don't go to further becoming.
"Now, if there are any who ask, 'Would there be the right contemplation of dualities in yet another way?' they should be told, 'There would.' 'How would that be?' 'Whatever stress comes into play is all from fabrication as a requisite condition': this is one contemplation. 'From the remainderless fading & cessation of that very fabrication, there is no coming into play of stress': this is a second contemplation. For a monk rightly contemplating this duality in this way — heedful, ardent, & resolute — one of two fruits can be expected: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return."
That is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One Well-gone, the Teacher, said further:
Any stress that comes into play
is all from fabrication
as a requisite
condition.
With the cessation of fabrication,
there is no stress
coming into play.
Knowing this drawback —
that stress comes from fabrication
as a requisite
condition —
with the tranquilizing of all fabrication,
with the stopping of perception:
that's how there is
the ending of stress.
Knowing this as it actually is,
an attainer-of-wisdom
sees rightly.
Seeing rightly,
the wise —
overcoming the fetter of Mara —
go to no further becoming.
"Now, if there are any who ask, 'Would there be the right contemplation of dualities in yet another way?' they should be told, 'There would.' 'How would that be?' 'Whatever stress comes into play is all from consciousness as a requisite condition': this is one contemplation. 'From the remainderless fading & cessation of that very consciousness, there is no coming into play of stress': this is a second contemplation. For a monk rightly contemplating this duality in this way — heedful, ardent, & resolute — one of two fruits can be expected: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return."
That is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One Well-gone, the Teacher, said further:
Any stress that comes into play
is all from consciousness
as a requisite
condition.
With the cessation of consciousness,
there is no stress
coming into play.
Knowing this drawback —
that stress comes from consciousness
as a requisite
condition —
with the stilling of consciousness, the monk
free from hunger
is totally unbound.
"Now, if there are any who ask, 'Would there be the right contemplation of dualities in yet another way?' they should be told, 'There would.' 'How would that be?' 'Whatever stress comes into play is all from contact as a requisite condition': this is one contemplation. 'From the remainderless fading & cessation of that very contact, there is no coming into play of stress': this is a second contemplation. For a monk rightly contemplating this duality in this way — heedful, ardent, & resolute — one of two fruits can be expected: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return."
That is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One Well-gone, the Teacher, said further:
For those overcome by contact,
flowing along in the stream of becoming,
following a miserable path,
the ending of fetters
is far away.
While those who comprehend contact,
delighting in stilling through discernment,
they, by breaking through contact,
free from hunger,
are totally unbound.
"Now, if there are any who ask, 'Would there be the right contemplation of dualities in yet another way?' they should be told, 'There would.' 'How would that be?' 'Whatever stress comes into play is all from feeling as a requisite condition': this is one contemplation. 'From the remainderless fading & cessation of that very feeling, there is no coming into play of stress': this is a second contemplation. For a monk rightly contemplating this duality in this way — heedful, ardent, & resolute — one of two fruits can be expected: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return."
That is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One Well-gone, the Teacher, said further:
Knowing that
whatever is felt —
pleasure, pain,
neither pleasure nor pain,
within or without —
is stressful,
deceptive,
dissolving,
seeing its passing away
at each contact,
each
contact,
he knows it right there:
with just the ending of feeling,
there is no stress
coming into play.
"Now, if there are any who ask, 'Would there be the right contemplation of dualities in yet another way?' they should be told, 'There would.' 'How would that be?' 'Whatever stress comes into play is all from craving as a requisite condition': this is one contemplation. 'From the remainderless fading & cessation of that very craving, there is no coming into play of stress': this is a second contemplation. For a monk rightly contemplating this duality in this way — heedful, ardent, & resolute — one of two fruits can be expected: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return."
That is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One Well-gone, the Teacher, said further:
With craving his companion, a man
wanders on a long, long time.
Neither in this state here
nor anywhere else
does he go beyond
the wandering- on.
Knowing this drawback —
that craving brings stress into play —
free from craving,
devoid of clinging,
mindful, the monk
lives the wandering life.
"Now, if there are any who ask, 'Would there be the right contemplation of dualities in yet another way?' they should be told, 'There would.' 'How would that be?' 'Whatever stress comes into play is all from clinging as a requisite condition': this is one contemplation. 'From the remainderless fading & cessation of that very clinging, there is no coming into play of stress': this is a second contemplation. For a monk rightly contemplating this duality in this way — heedful, ardent, & resolute — one of two fruits can be expected: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return."
That is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One Well-gone, the Teacher, said further:
From clinging as a requisite condition
comes becoming.
One who has come into being
goes
to stress.
There is death
for one who is born.
This is the coming into play
of stress.
Thus, with the ending of clinging, the wise
seeing rightly,
directly knowing
the ending of birth,
go to no further becoming.
"Now, if there are any who ask, 'Would there be the right contemplation of dualities in yet another way?' they should be told, 'There would.' 'How would that be?' 'Whatever stress comes into play is all from disturbance as a requisite condition': this is one contemplation. 'From the remainderless fading & cessation of that very disturbance, there is no coming into play of stress': this is a second contemplation. For a monk rightly contemplating this duality in this way — heedful, ardent, & resolute — one of two fruits can be expected: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return."
That is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One Well-gone, the Teacher, said further:
Any stress that comes into play
is all from disturbance
as a requisite
condition.
With the cessation of disturbance,
there is no stress
coming into play.
Knowing this drawback —
that stress comes from disturbance
as a requisite
condition —
with the relinquishing
of all disturbance,
a monk released in non-disturbance,
his craving for becoming crushed,
his mind at peace,
his wandering-on in birth totally ended:
he has no further becoming.
"Now, if there are any who ask, 'Would there be the right contemplation of dualities in yet another way?' they should be told, 'There would.' 'How would that be?' 'Whatever stress comes into play is all from nutriment as a requisite condition': this is one contemplation. 'From the remainderless fading & cessation of that very nutriment, there is no coming into play of stress': this is a second contemplation. For a monk rightly contemplating this duality in this way — heedful, ardent, & resolute — one of two fruits can be expected: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return."
That is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One Well-gone, the Teacher, said further:
Any stress that comes into play
is all from nutriment
as a requisite
condition.
With the cessation of nutriment,
there is no stress
coming into play.
Knowing this drawback —
that stress comes from nutriment
as a requisite
condition —
comprehending all nutriment,
independent of all nutriment,
rightly seeing
freedom from disease
through the total ending
of fermentations,
judiciously associating,
a judge,
he, an attainer-of-wisdom,
goes beyond judgment,
beyond classification.
"Now, if there are any who ask, 'Would there be the right contemplation of dualities in yet another way?' they should be told, 'There would.' 'How would that be?' 'Whatever stress comes into play is all from what is perturbed as a requisite condition': this is one contemplation. 'From the remainderless fading & cessation of what is perturbed, there is no coming into play of stress': this is a second contemplation. For a monk rightly contemplating this duality in this way — heedful, ardent, & resolute — one of two fruits can be expected: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return."
That is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One Well-gone, the Teacher, said further:
Any stress that comes into play
is all from what is perturbed
as a requisite
condition.
With the cessation of what is perturbed,
there is no stress
coming into play.
Knowing this drawback —
that stress comes from what is perturbed
as a requisite
condition —
the monk thus renouncing perturbance,
putting a stop to fabrications,
free from perturbance, free
from clinging,
mindful he lives
the wandering life.
"Now, if there are any who ask, 'Would there be the right contemplation of dualities in yet another way?' they should be told, 'There would.' 'How would that be?' 'For one who is dependent, there is wavering': this is one contemplation. 'One who is independent doesn't waver': this is a second contemplation. For a monk rightly contemplating this duality in this way — heedful, ardent, & resolute — one of two fruits can be expected: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return."
That is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One Well-gone, the Teacher, said further:
One who's independent
doesn't
waver.
One who's dependent,
clinging
to this state here
or anywhere else,
doesn't go beyond
the wandering-on.
Knowing this drawback —
the great danger in
dependencies —
in-
dependent,
free from clinging,
mindful the monk
lives the wandering life.
"Now, if there are any who ask, 'Would there be the right contemplation of dualities in yet another way?' they should be told, 'There would.' 'How would that be?' 'Formless phenomena are more peaceful than forms': this is one contemplation. 'Cessation is more peaceful than formless phenomena': this is a second contemplation. For a monk rightly contemplating this duality in this way — heedful, ardent, & resolute — one of two fruits can be expected: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return."
That is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One Well-gone, the Teacher, said further:
Those beings headed to forms,
and those standing in the formless,
with no knowledge of cessation,
return to further becoming.
But, comprehending form,
not taking a stance in formless things,
those released in cessation
are people who've left death behind.
"Now, if there are any who ask, 'Would there be the right contemplation of dualities in yet another way?' they should be told, 'There would.' 'How would that be?' 'Whatever is considered as "This is true" by the world with its devas, Maras, & Brahmas, with its contemplatives & brahmans, its royalty & commonfolk, is rightly seen as it actually is with right discernment by the noble ones as "This is false"': this is one contemplation. 'Whatever is considered as "This is false" by the world with its devas, Maras, & Brahmas, with its contemplatives & brahmans, its royalty & commonfolk, is rightly seen as it actually is with right discernment by the noble ones as "This is true"': this is a second contemplation. For a monk rightly contemplating this duality in this way — heedful, ardent, & resolute — one of two fruits can be expected: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return."
That is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One Well-gone, the Teacher, said further:
See the world, together with its devas,
conceiving not-self to be self.
Entrenched in name & form,
they conceive that 'This is true.'
In whatever terms they conceive it
it turns into something other than that,
and that's what's false about it:
changing,
it's deceptive by nature.
Undeceptive by nature
is Unbinding:
that the noble ones know
as true.
They, through breaking through
to the truth,
free from hunger,
are totally unbound.
"Now, if there are any who ask, 'Would there be the right contemplation of dualities in yet another way?' they should be told, 'There would.' 'How would that be?' 'Whatever is considered as "This is bliss" by the world with its devas, Maras, & Brahmas, with its contemplatives & brahmans, its royalty & commonfolk, is rightly seen as it actually is with right discernment by the noble ones as "This is stressful"': this is one contemplation. 'Whatever is considered as "This is stressful" by the world with its devas, Maras, & Brahmas, with its contemplatives & brahmans, its royalty & commonfolk, is rightly seen as it actually is with right discernment by the noble ones as "This is bliss"': this is a second contemplation. For a monk rightly contemplating this duality in this way — heedful, ardent, & resolute — one of two fruits can be expected: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return."
That is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One Well-gone, the Teacher, said further:
All sights, sounds, smells, tastes,
tactile sensations, & ideas
that are welcome,
appealing,
agreeable —
as long as they're said
to exist,
are supposed by the world
together with its devas
to be bliss.
But when they cease,
they're supposed by them
to be stress.
The stopping of self-identity
is viewed by the noble ones
as bliss.
This is contrary
to what's seen
by the world as a whole.
What others say is blissful,
the noble ones say is stress.
What others say is stressful,
the noble know as bliss.
See the Dhamma, hard to understand!
Here those who don't know
are confused.
For those who are veiled,
it's darkness,
blindness
for those who don't see.
But for the good it is blatant,
like light
for those who see.
Though in their very presence,
they don't understand it —
dumb animals, unadept in the Dhamma.
It's not easy
for those overcome
by passion for becoming,
flowing along
in the stream of becoming,
falling under Mara's sway,
to wake up
to this Dhamma.
Who, apart from the noble,
is worthy to wake up
to this state? —
the state that,
through rightly knowing it,
they're free from fermentation,
totally
unbound.
That is what the Blessed One said. Gratified, the monks delighted in the Blessed One's words. And while this explanation was being given, the minds of 60 monks, through lack of clinging, were fully released from fermentation.
Hết phần Kinh Tập (Chương 3) (Sutta Nipata)

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